Japanese company plans man-made meteor shower at Tokyo Olympic Games – NH Voice

8 months ago Comments Off on Japanese company plans man-made meteor shower at Tokyo Olympic Games – NH Voice
Japanese company plans man-made meteor shower at Tokyo Olympic Games

A Japanese company has been planning something very unique for Japanese Olympic Games to take place in 2020. Star-Ale plans to create a man-made meteor shower as the main attraction for the opening ceremony of the XXXII Olympiad in Tokyo in 2020.

The developer of the Sky Canvas light show has proposed the artificial meteor shower for the opening ceremony of the Olympic Games. Star-ALE founder and chief executive officer Lena Okajima was of the view that this is a very new thing as it mixes astronomy and the entertainment business.

“These shooting stars that are born through science function as a high-profit entertainment business, and the resulting funds will serve to further advance fundamental scientific research”, mentioned Okajima.

Star-ALE said that it wants have meteor shower in Olympic slow in almost same manner as natural shower occur. As per the company, the Sky Canvas has been designed around a satellite full of hundreds of ‘source particles’ that will act as ingredients for a shooting star.

The particles would be launched around the world from the spacecraft before entering the atmosphere and starting to burn at a height of around 40 to 50 miles. If all goes well and the particles are launched then the Sky Canvas would appear slightly dimmer than Sirius, the brightest observable on earth.

This meteor shower will prove costly as each meteor pellet will cost Japan $8,100. The satellite construction and launch will also be quite expensive. Okajima was of the view that astronomy in Japan is supported largely by government assistance.

If public funds are used to create equipments then they can aim to fly further into space and conduct more accurate experiments and observations. Star-ALE said that it hopes to start testing the microsatellite’s capabilities outside of a laboratory setting by the end of next year.

“With the Japanese Olympic Games only four years away, a Japanese company is working on lighting up the skies above Tokyo in a way never before witnessed. Star-Ale plans to create a man-made meteor shower as the main attraction of the opening ceremony in 2020. According to a report in The Christian Science Monitor, the company ALE. Co, Ltd., aims to marry atmospheric study and entertainment with its Sky Canvas Project,” according to a news report published by Inquisitr.

Shooting stars, as we know them, are basically meteoroids that are on a collision path with earth. As they enter our atmosphere, the friction makes them white hot before burning up. To mimic this effect, Star-Ale is launching a number of satellites in 2017, each with a payload of up to 1,000 specially developed pyrotechnic materials in the form of pellets called source particles, coated with different compositions to create a range of colors.

As they are released and hit the atmosphere, they will ignite, with each particle burning in a color determined by its coating, as it hurtles towards earth. The material will travel a third of the way around the earth and ignite 35 to 50 miles above the ground, in an explosion of vibrant color, appearing as a real meteor shower would, yet unlike anything previously witnessed in the night sky. The particles will be travelling at around five-miles-per-second, much slower than natural meteorites which can travel at speeds of up to 50-miles-per-second and will therefore present a longer display.

According to a report in CS Monitor by Ben Thompson, “A Japanese company is looking to combine atmospheric study and entertainment with its Sky Canvas Project, which it hopes can generate a satellite-based artificial meteor shower for the 2020 Summer Olympics, held in Tokyo.”

Star-ALE, the developer of the Sky Canvas light show proposed for the opening ceremonies of the Olympic games, hopes its artificial shooting stars will support future astronomical projects in Japan.

“This type of project is new in the sense in that it mixes astronomy and the entertainment business,” Star-ALE founder and chief executive officer Lena Okajima said in her corporate profile. “These shooting stars that are born through science function as a high-profit entertainment business, and the resulting funds will serve to further advance fundamental scientific research.”

A report published in I4U informed, “Japanese startup is working on to create artificial meteor shower. The man-made meteor shower will deliver shooting stars on demand and light up skies at specific locations and times. The company is hoping to generate this artificial meteor shower during the 2020 Olympics held in Tokyo.”

So, how does this meteor shower will be different from firework? Company Star-ALE says a micro satellite will be launched into skies that will eject shooting stars when required and put on a breathtaking celestial show and unlike fireworks, this pyrotechnics show will be visible across an area of 125 miles. It will be about 400 times wider than a usual firework display.

“A natural shooting star occurs when a particle in space, with a size of a few millimeters, enters the atmosphere and burns brightly through a process called plasma emission. Our goal is to artificially recreate this process.” Company blog says.

Japanese company plans man-made meteor shower at Tokyo Olympic Games – NH Voice